‘Crevice’ and ‘Crevasse’: A Gap in Meaning

Cracks, crevices And fissures are very similar words: both are of Old French origin creative, a verb that means “to break or explode” and both refer to an opening of some kind. In fact, you could say that the only noticeable difference between the two is the size of the holes they represent.

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A cleft is a narrow opening caused by a crack or fissure. Most of us find them in rocks, walls or cliffs:

All 325 other known species of angler… sit outdoors and attract prey with lures. H. hallucinations no decoys. Instead, it hunts by squeezing itself into small pieces Loophole where small fish hide. —Caroline Williams, new scientistMay 16, 2009

One particular type of ladybug, the multicolored Asian ladybug, has developed the rude habit of invading homes during the cold months, entering through cracks and crevices. Loophole to find a warm place to curl up for the winter. — Don Finley, San Antonio Express-NewsDecember 27, 2004

Some authors use the word to refer to similar openings found in other documents:

These [cinnamon] The cake is spongy, soft and delicious. The cream cheese layer blends well with them and flows into every crack and crevices, crevices, making every bite divine. — Audrey Alfaro, Spokesperson-Review (Spokane, Wash.), December 19, 2017

The beetle then crawls back to its hiding place to digest the meal. Its flat body allows it to hide in the Loophole in mattresses, box springs and bed frames. —David Downey, Newspaper-Telegram (Long Beach, California), July 15, 2017

And there are non-literal uses of the word:

The oil paintings in “Running Rabbits” are sumptuous, layered, and resplendent—almost like visual jewelry—but they are also painful and discordant when thrown into the complex. Loophole of history and memory. —Jonathan Curiel, Weekly SFJanuary 10, 2018

These [cinnamon] The cake is spongy, soft and delicious. The cream cheese layer blends well with them and flows into every crack and crevices, crevices, making every bite divine. — Audrey Alfaro, Spokesperson-Review (Spokane, Wash.), December 19, 2017

Loophole Refers to a deep hole or crack in a glacier or earth. In most cases, the word appears with enough context that its depth is easily discernible:

This is how John All, co-author of Icefall: Adventures on the wild edge of our changing, dangerous planetdescribe the moment after he plunged 70 feet in one fissures in the Himalayas. Alone and dislocated his shoulder, he had to drag himself from ledge to ledge to the surface using only one arm. — Simon Worrall, national geographyMay 7, 2017

A Denali climber was rescued yesterday (Monday, June 1) after spending 14 hours deep in a fissures. National Park Service spokesman Maureen Gualtieri said Martin Takak, 38, from Slovakia, fell into the cliff without a lanyard. fissures while descending to a peak before 1:30 a.m. Monday. — Dan Bross, Alaska Public Radio, June 6, 2017

Because crevices, crevices arguably the more familiar of the two words, some writers will occasionally use it in place of fissureseven if clearly a wormhole, rather than a narrow or shallow crack, is what is being described:

Their mother, a teacher, and father, a shoemaker, probably fell in crevices, crevices of the glacier, where their bodies were preserved. — Zoha Quamar, CNN.comJuly 19, 2017

One way to remember the difference between crevices, crevices And fissures that is I (as found in crevices, crevicessmaller hole) is a thinner letter One (as found in fissures, the hole is larger). Or, you should step into a fissuresmaybe you’ll have plenty of time to “Ahhhs”?

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Categories: Usage Notes
Source: vothisaucamau.edu.vn

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