On Synecdoche and Metonymy

reformation refers to a figure of speech in which the word for part of something is used to refer to the thing itself (like employed for “worker”), or less commonly, the word for an object used to refer to a part of that thing (as when society denotes “high society”). IN metonymya word associated with something that is used to refer to that thing (as when crown used to mean “king” or “queen”).

terms metonymy And reformation Refers to two similar figures of speech commonly used as literary devices. (They are easy to confuse, so read it as many times as you need to.)

What is synecdoche vs metonymy?

‘Synecdoche’ is when the word part of something is used to refer to the whole, or less commonly, the word whole is used to refer to a part. ‘Metonym’ is when a word related to something is used to refer to the thing itself.

What is Synecdoche?

reformation to refer to a picture of speech in which the word for part of something is used to refer to the thing itself, or less commonly, when the word for a thing is used to refer to a part of that thing. The first type of inversion is what we hear when someone uses it wheel to refer to a car (“she showed off her new wheels”) or topic to refer to clothing (“a new set of threads”); the latter is what happens when phrases like “introduction to society” are used to refer to specific introductions to upper society.

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A classic example of the reformation is the use of the term hand means “worker” (as in “all hands on deck”) or noun sail means “ship”. Synecdoche is also sometimes used in the names of sports teams, e.g. White Sox, Blue Jackets.

What is a metonymy?

metonymy refers to a figure of speech in which the word for a thing is used to refer to something related to that, such as crown for “king” or “queen” or The White House or oval office for “The President.” The phrase “a pile of clothes” for a group of businessmen is an example of metonymy; it uses the common wardrobe of entrepreneurs as shorthand for people themselves.

It’s metonymy when you use a person’s name to refer to that person’s work, such as when you say “We’re reading Austen this semester” when you really mean “We’re reading his work.” of Austen this semester.” And that’s metaphorical when you use a city’s name to refer to that city’s team, like when you say “Houston has a six-point lead.”

Some examples of metonymy are so common that they have become a regular part of the vocabulary. The use of press means “journalists” dating back to the 17th century and appearing in the First Amendment (“Congress shall make no law… restricting the right to freedom of speech, or of the press…”). It identifies journalists with the name of the device used to print the newspaper.

Likewise, a sports journalist might say that a team’s bats have fallen, while what the writer really means is that the team’s batters have fallen. Sometimes metaphors are used to make a name more appealing than the object it replaces, such as when surf and grass fielda phrase that uses two rhymes for sea and land, used for a dish that combines seafood and beef.

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Like many terms used in rhetoric, both reformation And metonymy derived from Greek. The synchronized- IN reformation means “with, with” (same as in synonym) And ekdochē means “meaning, interpretation.” metonymy meanwhile, combine greek meta (“among, with, after,” same root word is found in metaphor) with nicknamemeans “name” or “word”.

Now that you’ve figured these two out, check out this list of other popular rhetorical devices.

Categories: Usage Notes
Source: vothisaucamau.edu.vn

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